Coastal Cottage designed by the owners’ daughter offers modern retreat

 

 

Owners: Chantal and Michael Jennings

Size: 1200 square feet

Architect: Elizabeth Jennings

Location: Schoodic Peninsula, Maine

Interior Design: Chantal and Michael Jennings

Furniture: Thos. Moser

 

The moment you turn down the nearly 1/2 mile private driveway to the Jennings’ cottage, you know you are about to experience something magical. Cut through oldgrowth forests, the driveway winds through coastal pines draped in usnea. The harsh, coastal weather has stunted and twisted the jack pines to look like meticulously pruned and trained bonsai. The forest floor is covered in lush green mosses and massive granite boulders left behind from receding glaciers dot the landscape. The drive ends on a ledge of pink granite with sweeping views of the Atlantic ocean and the protected entrance to the harbor. The Jennings have left this unique property as intact as the day they purchased it almost 37 years ago. 

Finding an artist colony in down east Maine and a daughter’s designs

 

The property was once owned by California watercolor artist, Barse Miller. Drawn by the rugged shores that occupy this area, Mr. Miller established his small summer artist colonyRangemark. Here he hosted numerous watercolor workshops until his death in 1973. This place offered solace, beauty, fair winds for sailing, and an opportunity to paint en plein air. 

When the Jennings purchased the property in 1983, the land and views were breathtaking, but the buildings nothing more than a dilapidated main house, a tiny bunkhouse, and horse shed. Years later they found themselves with the arduous task of demolition, and hauling away the allbutabandoned property before they could begin breaking ground on the new site for the cottage. 

Elizabeth Jennings’ goal was to create the small escape her parents envisioned. Her initial design had clean, modern lines. She wanted to create a home that was minimal but retained much of the “New England” charm while not competing with the land. Her design included cedar shakes, copper flashingand a standing seam copper roof. Elizabeth added weather-related adaptations: overhangs, a covered entryway, and a slate-floored entrance that would accommodate muddy boots and wet paws.

The open layout of the interior invites intimate dinner parties. The large southern-facing windows provide plenty of ambient light. When it came time to set Elizabeth’s design into motion, her parents turned to Bensonwood in New Hampshire.

From day one, Chantal and Michael were involved in every aspect of construction and the finish details of the cottage. They chose the house site, guided construction trucks up and down the driveway, hauled rocks for the foundation and landscaping, chose fixtures, assisted the finish carpenter, and designed custom cabinets.

View Former Artist Colony and Demolition

 

View Installation and Build of the Cottage

A Cottage inspired by Thos. Moser Furniture

Bedroom and Master Bathroom

To the far left of the cottage are the master bedroom and bath. Here the early morning light greets each day with a view of the entrance to the harbor and the ocean. The furniture in the bedroom includes one of the first Pencil Post bed designs from Moser. Chantal wanted an uncluttered and calming bedroom. The nightstands on either side of the bed are simple Minimus Tables built by Chantal at a Customer-In-Residence program. In the corner of the room sits an Aria Chair Michael completed during his Thos. Moser Customer-In-Residence program. The light salmon upholstery was chosen to reflect the color of the granite boulders and shoreline. The master bath, set behind the bedroom, houses custom cabinetry, a compact washer and dryer, and a beautiful river stone shower. 

Kitchen 

The small, yet well-equipped, kitchen has a stunning waterfall island crafted by Sheldon Slate Company of Monson, Maine. Chantal wanted the space to be easy to work in, allow for conversation, be comfortable for daily meals, and polished enough for a cocktail party. The carefully thought out cabinet layout allows for fluid movement throughout the kitchen and houses everything a cook needs. The small dishwasher, combination microwave/oven, and induction range are energy efficient. The island’s Auburn Stools are from Thos. Moser. 

 

Living and Dining Area 

The main living space is unobstructed by walls and creates a welcoming space for guests. There is even a secret loft for their grandchildren complete with a porthole. A Harvest Table accompanied by six early Fanback Chairs, a predecessor to our Catena chairs, were Chantal and Michael’s first Moser purchases in 1981. Chantal points out, “I wouldn’t trade the table or chairs for anything. I raised my children at that table, and we’ve shared many meals, and conversations here. That table is a part of our family’s history.” 

The beautiful antique Marblehead pond yacht was a housewarming gift from Mary and Tom Moser. Hanging on the wall over the fireplace, the vintage yacht links land and sea.

The floors and ceilings, inspired by Moser, are crafted of ash. Michael recalls, “When the Moser’s had their first showroom in Portland, Maine, the floors were ash.” He remembers how he loved the way the cherry furniture stood out on the light ash floors. Chantal and Michael wanted to incorporate this warmth into the interior of the new cottage.

 

The Jennings find the cottage liberating. Its small size and beautiful furnishings free up time to enjoy the surrounding area. Elizabeth is delighted that her parents are so happy with their little coastal retreat. 

“The furniture is a testament to good design, it looks as stylish and modern today as the day we bought it.”  Chantal says, “It showcases the versatility of Moser’s designs. An upholstered sofa pairs beautifully in the same room with the Vita Chairs, Harvest Table, and Auburn Stools. The designs go with anything and each piece has a timeless quality.

Hiking on the single-file trails along the hidden coves of their property, it’s clear that family, friends, sustainability, and caring for their community are of the utmost importance to the Jennings. From curating a collection of furniture to building a sustainable, unobtrusive home, with a deep appreciation for all things beautifully made is what brought this family, the Moser’s, and their little cottage on the rocky Maine coast together more than 37 years ago.